From waste to resource

Closed 31 Jul 2016

Opened 29 Jun 2016

Feedback Updated 6 Mar 2017

We Asked

We asked you about your views on the aims and ambitions set out in the draft strategy and the concepts of reduce, reuse, recycle. 

You Said

The majority of you that responded to the survey supported all strategy aims (83%-95% agreed or strongly agreed with each of the aims) .The general messages were also mirrored in the focus group discussions.

The key messages included:

  • Some of the aims (e.g. aims 2, 3 and 4) should be more aspirational and seek to achieve much more than currently stated.
  • Some of the aims should be made clearer, meaning not only more information about the aims but how they might be achieved.
  • There should be an increase in and more regular communications, engagement and education regarding waste management.
  • While some examples of practical ways to reduce and reuse waste, generally, people found it harder to engage with the concept of ‘reduce’ and ‘reuse’. The general perception was that greater responsibility lies with retailers and business and residents are somewhat limited in what they can do.
  • Recycling is generally accepted and viewed as a responsibility that all residents should share.
  • There is a desire to be able to recycle a wider range of items, particularly food waste. However, some had concerns, which included attracting vermin, the waste producing bad smells and the recycling process becoming more complicated.
  • There was also a call for an increase in meaningful and effective communication about waste services and the three concepts, and for this to happen more regularly.

We Did

The responses to the public consultation being carried out over the four weeks from 29 June 2016 - 31 July 2016 will help shape the final Waste Strategy. 

Overview

A waste strategy for Birmingham
 
From waste to resource - rethinking and renewing Birmingham’s approach to waste.
 
Over the last 18 months Birmingham City Council has worked with citizens and other partners around the city to develop a vision for how Birmingham deals with its waste. In this vision we, the city council, see waste as a valuable resource so we want to find ways of throwing away as little waste as possible.
 
We will make this happen by developing plans that meet the needs of the people who live in Birmingham (which could be different dependent on where you live). And everyone will need to play their part if the city is to share the environmental, economic and social benefits of viewing waste as a resource.
 
Birmingham City Council is now consulting on the aims and ambitions that will be part of a strategy for changing the way in which we view waste – to one where we see it as an asset, something that creates value for Birmingham not just economically, but socially and environmentally too.
 
The responses to the public consultation being carried out over the four weeks from 29 June 2016 - 31 July 2016 will help shape an options appraisal (based on the feedback we receive to this consultation) that will then allow us to update the city’s Waste Strategy in autumn 2016.
 
It is therefore important that anyone with an interest in the topic has their say. As well as a survey, there will be a range of other ways to have a say including an online webchat and citizens’ panel, all of which will be widely publicised during the consultation period.
 
It is important to understand whether or not you agree with these aims and ambitions and which of these matters most to you. The first part of this document sets out the reasons why we need to change our approach, while the second part outlines the aims and ambitions we want your feedback on.

Why We Are Consulting

We live in a changing world and how we manage our waste into the future needs to change to reflect a wider environmental, social and economic landscape.

This consultation represents the first stage of a journey towards a new waste strategy for Birmingham. And over the coming months we will continue to engage with individuals, local communities, businesses and organisations based in Birmingham to ensure that we have the right plans in place and that the key messages from the strategy are heard across the city.

Areas

  • ACOCKS GREEN
  • ASTON
  • BARTLEY GREEN
  • BILLESLEY
  • BORDESLEY GREEN
  • BOURNVILLE
  • BRANDWOOD
  • CITY CENTRE
  • CITY-WIDE
  • EDGBASTON
  • ERDINGTON
  • HALL GREEN
  • HANDSWORTH WOOD
  • HARBORNE
  • HODGE HILL
  • KINGS NORTON
  • KINGSTANDING
  • LADYWOOD
  • LONGBRIDGE
  • LOZELLS AND EAST HANDSWORTH
  • MOSELEY AND KINGS HEATH
  • NECHELLS
  • NORTHFIELD
  • OSCOTT
  • PERRY BARR
  • QUINTON
  • SELLY OAK
  • SHARD END
  • SHELDON
  • SOHO
  • SOUTH YARDLEY
  • SPARKBROOK
  • SPRINGFIELD
  • STECHFORD AND YARDLEY NORTH
  • STOCKLAND GREEN
  • SUTTON FOUR OAKS
  • SUTTON NEW HALL
  • SUTTON TRINITY
  • SUTTON VESEY
  • TYBURN
  • WASHWOOD HEATH
  • WEOLEY

Audiences

  • All residents

Interests

  • Environment