We Asked, You Said, We Did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We Asked

Consultation has now closed

You Said

0 responses were received

We Did

Contact below with any questions:

School Admissions (Fair Access and Attendance)
0121 303 1888
admissionsconsultation@birmingham.gov.uk

We Asked

We asked for your comments on the proposal to remove Boarding Provision from Hunter's Hill College.

You Said

We received a total of 21 responses: 10 in favour, 10 against and 1 that did no indicate.

Most of the responses were from Parents and Staff which mentioned a number of key themes. A summary analysis is appended to the decision report which can be found via the link at the bottom of this page.

We Did

We analysed your responses and removed personal data from your comments (redacted). We then shared the analysis and redacted comments with the decision maker for their consideration in reaching a decision.

We Asked

Do you support the Proposals?

Do you have other thoughts for improving and managing the park in future?

You Said

100% of people supported the Proposals

Park should be better lit, improved accesses; and with more events, and activities, coffee van to draw people in, and make the park feel safer.  Ideas included art pop ups, Chelsea display site, tai chi, part of City centre trail, yoga, CBSO concerts.  

One person wanted to get involved in the Park User Group

There were many comments about the ongoing Anti Social Behaviour, and one comment that the black railings were intimidating.

 

We Did

Lighting to the park has been improved now already. Some repairs to  colonnade floodlights are ongoing.

The first Park User Group has met and reviewed consultation and proposals; and includes local people keen to help improve the space.

Other Phase 1 improvements will now proceed to delivery to improve attractiveness, access, and safety of the Park. The CCTV scheme is still at feasibility stage.  Use of the Park for other events / displays will be encouraged amongst different Council departments.

We Asked

We asked for your comments on the proposal to alter the lower age limit of Newhall Primary School from 3 years to 4 years to remove the nursery.

 

You Said

We received 2 responses which were opposed to the proposal.

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We Did

The proposal was approved on 28th November 2019, an analysis of the responses can be found in the decision report.

A link to the report can be found at the bottom of the page.

 

We Asked

We asked for your comments on the proposal to relocate Skilts School to a new site and increase the number of pupil places.

You Said

We received 17 responses to the proposal. Of these 17 responses, 13 were in favour and 4 were against.

An analysis of the consultation responses can be found via the link to the decision on this page.

We Did

All responses were shared with the decision maker who approved the proposal.

 Birmingham City Council, as the Local Authority, in exercise of the powers conferred on it, has determined to implement the proposal, as detailed.

The Cabinet Member for Education, Skills and Culture has approved the proposal to:

  • Transfer Skilts Special School to a new site at Hallmoor Road, Birmingham B33 9QY with effect from 1st September 2021.
  • Increase the number of pupil places from 64 to 90 with effect from 1st January 2020; and,
  • Increase the number of pupil places from 90 to 120 with effect from1st September 2021.

 

We Asked

We asked for for your comments on the proposal to alter the age limit of Redhill Primary School from 3 years to 4 years.

You Said

We received 1 response to which was opposed to the proposal.

We Did

The proposal was approved by the decision makers on 28th November 2019.

A link to the decision can be found via the link on this page.

We Asked

For comments on proposals for the highway changes in Perry Barr in support of the wider regeneration of the area.

You Said

1577 individuals responded to the consultation via BeHeard and 13 responses were received separately from key stakeholders and businesses/ organisation.

Analysis of the consultation responses identified key themes and concerns from local individuals and organisations including:

  • 81% of respondents do not support the proposed changes to the A34 Walsall Road/ A453 Aldridge Road junction layout as:
    • Some respondents felt there would be an incease in congestion as a result of removing the flyover; and
    • Some respondents felt there would be negative air quality impacts as a result of this proposed scheme.
  • 61% of respondents do not support the proposed changes to the A34/ A4040 junction layout changes as:
    • Some respondents felt there would be an increase in congestion as a result of introducing traffic lights leading to a delay to journeys.
  • 46% of respondents do not support the A34 cycle route extension as:
    • Some respondents felt that the cycle route extension would be a waste of money as it is not currently well used.

We Did

The Council has thoroughly read and analysed each response to the consultation. The consultation report will be presented to Cabinet on 15 October 2019, where the scheme's Full Business Case (FBC) will be considered and a decision made.

Following on from the feedback received during consultation, some elements of the scheme will be reviewed during detailed design. These include:

  • Providing more priority for cyclists at side roads along the A34 route;
  • Cyclist crossing movements at signalised junctions; and
  • Access to the Probation Office and Regina Drive on the western side of Walsall Road.
  • Consideration will be given to allowing vehicular traffic to turn right from Church Road to Aldridge Road to assist with traffic management.

Council responses to key issues raised are detailed in section 4.6.1 of the consultation report.

We Asked

Following a first consultation, on a new outbound bus lane along Sherlock Street (between Gooch Street and Belgrave Middleway) and a shared footway/cycleway on Sherlock Street in the direction of Digbeth.

We asked for your views on a revised proposal, incorporating:

  • A bus gate on Sherlock Street, located just after the junction with Gooch Street (in the direction of Belgrave Middleway). The bus gate will restrict traffic in the outbound direction to buses, cycles and Hackney Carriages (black cabs).
  • Widening the footpath between Hope Street and Mowbray Street. This is to improve pedestrian access to the bus stop.
  • Upgrading the crossing on Sherlock Street (close to Hope Street) to a parallel crossing for use by pedestrians and cyclists. This is to improve connectivity for cyclists travelling between National Cycle Route 5 on Gooch Street and the A38.

You Said

Of the 28 respondents who expressed an opinion as to whether the proposed Sherlock Street bus gate scheme should be implemented, 57% of respondents were in favour of the scheme. There were nine respondents who stated that they really liked the scheme and seven more were positive about the scheme. Only eight people stated a real dislike about the scheme and two more gave a negative view.

  • This is much better than the old scheme, it doesn't remove the cycle lanes and the bus gate will significantly reduce the traffic too and I'm fully supportive of this scheme.
  • You will need to enforce the bus gate for it to be beneficial to bus users.

This improves bus access to Sherlock Street without adversely affecting pedestrians or cycle users. The recent utility works have demonstrated that Sherlock Street is not essential for the flow of private motor traffic in the city centre, so it shouldn't cause any problems.

We Did

The scheme will be implemented in Spring 2020, with the following changes:

  • The advisory cycle path cannot be made mandatory due to loading/unloading provisions on Sherlock Street.
  • The pedestrian crossing will not be upgraded to a parallel crossing and left as existing as additional lighting works will be required for the whole of Sherlock Street. This is currently out of scope for the proposed bus priority measures.

We Asked

We asked for your comments on the school organisation proposal to establish a nursery class at Colebourne Primary School.

You Said

We received one reponse to the consultation which was in favour of the proposal.

We Did

The decision makers have approved the proposal to establish a nursery class at Colebourne Primary School with effect from 1st September 2019.

A link to the decision report can be found on this web page.

Thank you

We Asked

We asked for your comments on our proposed priority areas to help reduce health inequalities in Birmingham.

You Responded

We had 447 responses to the public consultation as well as collecting a wide range of views from our community engagement events and presentations to ward forums. 

People from a wide range of ages (from 20-79 years) responded to our consultation the largest amount of responses were received from those aged 50-59 years of age.

148 responses (35%) were from people reporting to have a physical or mental health condition.

296 responses were received from heterosexual or straight respondents, 20 from people identifying as gay or lesbian 10 from those identifying as bisexual.

173 respondents identified as Christian, 18 Muslim, 10 Sikh and 141 with no religion.

Those responding to the on-line survey were mainly from a White (British) background (286 respondents).

In general the sample was slightly older than the general population of Birmingham and did not represent as much ethnic diversity as we would have liked, despite specifically going out to hold meetings and engagement events in some of our most diverse wards.

We did specifically commission some focus groups to discuss the consultation with groups from our minority ethnic and faith communities to help inform the consultation but these were outside of the formal BeHeard online or written responses.

You Said

85% of respondents agreed with the Public Health vision and core values as laid out in the Public Health Green Paper. The four proposed priority areas were also well supported, the proportion of respondents agreeing with each priority were as follows: child health (90%); working age adults – 87%; ageing well – 92%; and healthy environment – 91%.  Similarly 94% agreed that addressing health inequalities should be one of our overarching themes.  There was less support for maximising the public health gains from the Commonwealth Games being an overarching theme – this was supported by 30% of respondents (with 18% of respondents disagreeing or strongly disagreeing with the theme).

Within the child health and wellbeing theme, support for the proposed priorities was high with the proportion of respondents supporting the priorities as follows: reducing infant mortality (91%); taking a whole systems approach to childhood obesity (88%); and supporting the mental and physical health of our most vulnerable children (87%). There was support for mental health and wellbeing being a priority for all children – not just our most vulnerable groups.

Support for the priorities outlined within the working age adult theme was also high with the proportion of respondents supporting each priority as follows: supporting workplaces to improve their employee wellbeing (84%); addressing the cumulative impact of unhealthy behaviours (84%); and supporting the mental and physical health of our most vulnerable adults (92%).

The priorities proposed within the older adult theme again had high levels of support, the proportion of respondents agreeing with each priority as follows: reducing social isolation (92%); providing system wide information and support (84%); developing community assets (90%); and supporting the mental and physical health of our most vulnerable older people (94%).

The proposed healthy environments priorities received support from a large proportion of respondents as follows: improving air quality (88%); increasing the health gains of new developments and transport schemes (82%); and health protection assurance and response (90%).

We Did

We have taken on board the views and opinions raised throughout the Green Paper consultation, community events and presentations to ward forums.

As a result of the responses received, the Health and Wellbeing Board has established five sub-groups to oversee development and delivery of shared action to drive City-wide improvement in the following areas:

Creating a Mentally Healthy City Forum

Creating a Healthy Food Forum;

Creating an Active City Forum;

Creating a City without Inequality,

These Forums are in addition to the already established Health Protection Forum. The Forums will strengthen the connection between the Health and Wellbeing Board and other City and regional partnership bodies. Each forum is chaired by a Cabinet Member and involves a range of local and national stakeholders and partners to drive action at pace in the city.

In addition the Health and Wellbeing Board has commissioned the Director of Public Health to lead on developing a framework for Creating a Healthy City. This framework will set out evidence based options to be applied through the levers of the Council and its partners such as planning, procurement, enforcement and community engagement, that will address the public health priorities for the city in a sustainable and effective way to ensure that Birmingham is a city in which every citizen and every age can live a healthy and fulfilling life.

We Asked

For clarity between the different proposals included in this consultation, 'we asked, you said, we did' information is listed below, by scheme.

You Said

See below

We Did

See below

We Asked

We asked for your comments on the proposal to alter the lower age limit of Gunter Primary School from 3 years to 4 years to remove the nursery.

You Said

We received 48 reponses.

An analysis of the responses can be found in the decision report.

We Did

The proposal was approved on 14th June 2019 and a link to the decision report can be found at the bottom of this page.

 

We Asked

Birmingham City Council is considering the use of a Public Space Protection Order (PSPO) to combat anti-social behaviour (ASB) in Birmingham City Centre.

You Said

1112 responses were received

We Did

Please contact emma.postin@birmingham.gov.uk with any questions

We Asked

For your comments regarding Birmingham City Council's proposal to transfer Oscott manor School to a new site.

You Said

We received 18 responses to the consultation, all of which were in favour of the proposal.

We Did

The proposal was approved on 15th June 2019.

A copy of the decision can be found via the link at the bottom of this page.

 

We Asked

Birmingham Safeguarding Children Board (BSCB) is developing a new safeguarding information website.

You Said

27 responses received

We Did

Please contact contactus@lscbbirmingham.org.uk with any questions

We Asked

Birmingham City Council believes that every person who lives and works in Birmingham has the right to clean air and that visitors to our city should also benefit from this clean air. But poor air quality in the city is contributing to hundreds of early, preventable deaths and making many existing health conditions worse. Poor air quality disproportionately affects the poorest and most vulnerable in our communities, including children. Furthermore, we have to recognise that many air pollutants have no known safe limits and although our efforts to date have rightly focused on the city centre we must ensure that all neighbourhoods of our city benefit from future interventions to improve air quality.

You Said

476 responses received

We Did

Please contact corporatecommunications@birmingham.gov.uk with any questions

We Asked

We asked for your comments on the proposal to revoke the implementation of 6th Form provision at Turves Green Boys School.

You Said

We received 4 responses to the consultation as described in the results. One response had written comments expressing concern about the amount of local provision if the 6th Form is revoked.

We Did

We analysed the responses and updated the results section of this webpage. The concerns about local provision were investigate and can confirm that there is sufficient further education provision in the area if the 6th Form is revoked.

We redacted (removed) presonal details from the responses before sharing with the decision makers for their information and consideration.

The joint decision makers at Birmingham City Council are:
Cabinet Member for Education, Skills and Culture;
Director of Education and Skills.

This webpage will be updated when the decision is known (before 11th June 2019).

 

We Asked

Birmingham City Council, as the Local Authority for Birmingham is proposing to make the following changes to The Pines Special School, a foundation special school for pupils with a Statement of Educational Need or Education and Health Care Plan for Autistic Spectrum Condition (ASC):

You Said

4 responses were received

We Did

Please contact edsisupport@birmingham.gov.uk with any questions

We Asked

The vision for Adult Social Care is for people to live healthy happy independent lives within their communities. Access to a supply of good quality, affordable housing and support options are key to the delivery of that vision.

You Said

10 responses received

We Did

Please contact Gordon.Strachan@birmingham.gov.uk with any questions

We Asked

Birmingham City Council plans to deliver parking controls in St Marks area of Ladywood to better manage parking within the area. This will involve the introduction of a number of Traffic Regulations Orders (TROs) details of which are as follows;

You Said

3 responses received

We Did

Please contact transport.projects@birmingham.gov.uk with any questions